Linux doukutsu_64bits "No such file or directory" error

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Apr 17, 2016 at 3:55 PM
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Linux Mint 17.3 'Rosa' 64-bit with 32-bit compatibility libraries. Using Mesa graphics drivers on Intel integrated graphics.

I keep getting "bash: ./doukutsu_64bits: No such file or directory" when I try to run the combined structure of linuxdoukutsu-1.01 and linuxDoukutsu-1.2 , as specified in this previous thread: http://www.cavestory.org/forums/threads/cs-running-on-linux-questions.6741/#post-212205

The doukutsu.bin and the doukutsu script work fine (haven't tested beyond menu yet). Furthermore, doukutsu_32bits actually works fine as well.

Running ldd on doukutsu_64bits seems to show that I have everything (The linux-vdso.so.1, of course, referenced here -> http://www.trilithium.com/johan/2005/08/linux-gate/ ):
Code:
ldd ./doukutsu_64bits    
   linux-vdso.so.1 =>  (0x00007fffd9b23000)
   libSDL-1.2.so.0 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libSDL-1.2.so.0 (0x00007f823a9df000)
   libpthread.so.0 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpthread.so.0 (0x00007f823a7c1000)
   libstdc++.so.6 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6 (0x00007f823a4bd000)
   libm.so.6 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libm.so.6 (0x00007f823a1b7000)
   libgcc_s.so.1 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1 (0x00007f8239fa1000)
   libc.so.6 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6 (0x00007f8239bdc000)
   libasound.so.2 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libasound.so.2 (0x00007f82398ec000)
   libdl.so.2 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libdl.so.2 (0x00007f82396e8000)
   libpulse-simple.so.0 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpulse-simple.so.0 (0x00007f82394e4000)
   libpulse.so.0 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpulse.so.0 (0x00007f823929b000)
   libX11.so.6 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libX11.so.6 (0x00007f8238f66000)
   libXext.so.6 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libXext.so.6 (0x00007f8238d54000)
   libcaca.so.0 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcaca.so.0 (0x00007f8238a87000)
   /lib/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 => /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 (0x00007f823ac75000)
   librt.so.1 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/librt.so.1 (0x00007f823887f000)
   libpulsecommon-4.0.so => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/pulseaudio/libpulsecommon-4.0.so (0x00007f8238618000)
   libjson-c.so.2 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libjson-c.so.2 (0x00007f823840d000)
   libdbus-1.so.3 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libdbus-1.so.3 (0x00007f82381c8000)
   libxcb.so.1 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libxcb.so.1 (0x00007f8237fa9000)
   libslang.so.2 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libslang.so.2 (0x00007f8237c19000)
   libncursesw.so.5 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libncursesw.so.5 (0x00007f82379e5000)
   libtinfo.so.5 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libtinfo.so.5 (0x00007f82377bc000)
   libz.so.1 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libz.so.1 (0x00007f82375a3000)
   libwrap.so.0 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libwrap.so.0 (0x00007f8237399000)
   libsndfile.so.1 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libsndfile.so.1 (0x00007f8237131000)
   libasyncns.so.0 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libasyncns.so.0 (0x00007f8236f2b000)
   libXau.so.6 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libXau.so.6 (0x00007f8236d27000)
   libXdmcp.so.6 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libXdmcp.so.6 (0x00007f8236b21000)
   libnsl.so.1 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libnsl.so.1 (0x00007f8236907000)
   libFLAC.so.8 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libFLAC.so.8 (0x00007f82366d6000)
   libvorbisenc.so.2 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libvorbisenc.so.2 (0x00007f823642d000)
   libvorbis.so.0 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libvorbis.so.0 (0x00007f8236200000)
   libogg.so.0 => /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libogg.so.0 (0x00007f8235ff7000)
   libresolv.so.2 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libresolv.so.2 (0x00007f8235ddc000)
I actually also tried the open-source nx engine after compiling it. It runs, but keeps crashing, like at reading signs, and randomly while playing. Seems unstable.

Overall, I'm guessing either the doukutsu_64bits binary wasn't compiled properly, or something is still missing for it specifically.
 
Apr 20, 2016 at 1:39 AM
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Can you run dir so that I can see your directory structure?
 
Apr 20, 2016 at 2:21 AM
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Ok, if you don't believe me:

Config.dat
data
doc
DoConfig.exe
doukutsu
doukutsu_32bits
doukutsu_64bits
doukutsu.bin
libSDL-1.2.so.0
 
Apr 20, 2016 at 3:39 AM
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What about file execution permissions and/or ownership?

Unlikely, but has there ever been a symlink by the same name?
 
Apr 20, 2016 at 5:12 AM
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ls -1l

-rw-r--r-- 1 lunac lunac 148 Oct 3 2007 Config.dat
drwxr-xr-x 4 lunac lunac 4096 Oct 3 2007 data
drwxr-xr-x 2 lunac lunac 16 Oct 3 2007 doc
-rwxr-xr-x 1 lunac lunac 98304 Oct 3 2007 DoConfig.exe
-rwxr-xr-x 1 lunac lunac 76 Oct 3 2007 doukutsu
-rwxr-xr-x 1 lunac lunac 1997431 Feb 4 2011 doukutsu_32bits
-rwxr-xr-x 1 lunac lunac 2208440 Jan 26 2011 doukutsu_64bits
-rwxr-xr-x 1 lunac lunac 1609652 Oct 3 2007 doukutsu.bin
-rw-r--r-- 1 lunac lunac 416748 Oct 9 2007 libSDL-1.2.so.0

The permissions are the same as those binaries that work. No symlink with such a name. I wouldn't make one named that anyway. Most binaries usually have a suffix of .x86 and .x86_64 to indicate bit type, or at least .bin . Have you tried the 64-bit binary on any Linux machine? I'm a little worried that most people might not have reported it, and just used the 32-bit one because it worked.
 
May 2, 2016 at 11:19 AM
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First things first: there is no good reason to use a 64-bit version of Cave Story.
The original program tends to use statically-allocated memory more or less anywhere it can get away with it,
which is probably the main reason why the modding community are able to do what they can do,
and the game was written for 32-bit Windows anyway.

So, if 32-bit works, just *use 32-bit.* There is no advantage to 64-bit, at all, for Cave Story.

Secondly: NXEngine... just don't use it ^.^;

The "best" option is: Use Wine.
Yes, I know, it's ridiculous.
But if NXEngine's playing up, well, NXEngine is the only non-proprietary engine that'll run the game, and all the proprietary engines are closed source binary blobs, so there's not really much that can be done with them.

Summary: "At least it'll run in Wine"
 
May 2, 2016 at 6:36 PM
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First things first: there is no good reason to use a 64-bit version of Cave Story.
The original program tends to use statically-allocated memory more or less anywhere it can get away with it,
which is probably the main reason why the modding community are able to do what they can do,
and the game was written for 32-bit Windows anyway.

So, if 32-bit works, just *use 32-bit.* There is no advantage to 64-bit, at all, for Cave Story.

Secondly: NXEngine... just don't use it ^.^;

The "best" option is: Use Wine.
Yes, I know, it's ridiculous.
But if NXEngine's playing up, well, NXEngine is the only non-proprietary engine that'll run the game, and all the proprietary engines are closed source binary blobs, so there's not really much that can be done with them.

Summary: "At least it'll run in Wine"
Let's just agree to completely disagree; This is no place to start an argument. Even if this does not ever resolve, it serves to inform any Linux user that strictly the 64-bit Linux binary and NXEngine likely wont work well, but the rest does. Let's just leave it at that.
 
May 2, 2016 at 7:52 PM
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Let's just agree to completely disagree; This is no place to start an argument. Even if this does not ever resolve, it serves to inform any Linux user that strictly the 64-bit Linux binary and NXEngine likely wont work well, but the rest does. Let's just leave it at that.
That's fine.
Wasn't trying to start an argument, I was just trying to note which solutions I know to work.
 
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